Customer Spotlights

May 10th, 2016 - Customer Spotlights

Meet John Gross, the Man Behind the Off-Centered Film Festival and the Rising Star of Your Career Envy

The Off-Centered Film Festival is an epic three-day celebration of film, food, and craft beer, hosted by the Alama Drafthouse Cinema in partnership with Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Now in its ninth year, the OCFF is kicking off its first ever multi-city tour with a medieval times theme. So prithee come hither and lend thy attention to the Alamo’s very own John Gross, who brings tales of film, merriment, and ale!

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October 19th, 2015 - Customer Spotlights

Meet Monica Hamburg, a Wildly Talented Actor and Comedian Who’s Played—and Met—Her Share of Characters, Part Two

Monica Hamburg is a performer who’s done it all, from video game voiceovers to film to hosting the dark and deeply funny Dazed and Convicted: Craigslost podcast. There were too many fascinating stories to fit in just one post, so please enjoy the second half of our interview.

If you haven’t read the first half yet, you can check it out here.

Monica Hamburg

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October 12th, 2015 - Customer Spotlights

Meet Monica Hamburg, a Wildly Talented Actor and Comedian Who’s Played—and Met—Her Share of Characters, Part One

Monica Hamburg is a performer who’s done it all, from video game voiceovers to film to hosting the dark and deeply funny Dazed and Convicted: Craigslost podcast. There were too many fascinating stories to fit in just one post, so please enjoy the first half until we publish the second later this week!

Monica Hamburg

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March 23rd, 2015 - Customer Spotlights

Meet Michael Bonnardi, a Connecticut Native Who’s Teaching People About History and Food With Two Cookbooks—One for People and One for their Canine Friends

Michael Bonnardi is the co-founder of Sunday Morning Publishing, a family-run company based in Connecticut that sells books, photography, and gifts. After discovering some fascinating family photos and documents, he published two books, which are passing down his grandparents’ recipes to today’s home chefs—and their pets.

When did you start Sunday Morning Publishing?

I started it a few years ago. My mother passed away and I really began to reflect on my family’s history. To help remember, I was looking through some old photographs and a ledger from my maternal grandparents. As a way to cope with my grief, I decided to put them together, which is how Ralph’s Recipes was born,and then Diets for Dogs.

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October 27th, 2014 - Customer Spotlights

Meet MJ Summers, a Bestselling Romance Novelist Who Went from Working for the Federal Government to Signing a Four-Book Deal with HarperCollins in Less than a Year

MJ Summers is the author of the Full Hearts series, whose first book was an instant Amazon bestseller. When she needed to publicize her debut novel with a small budget, she created a Onepager, helping launch her into the literary star with a multipage site she is today. Her third book, Breaking Love, comes out Tuesday, and what better way to embrace fall than by curling up with a good read?

When did you start writing?

I started April of last year. It’s a new thing for me, to be totally honest. I have a general science degree and after a long and windy path, found myself working as a mediator for the federal government. Then I had kids and stayed home to be with them for close to eight years before I began writing. I read a couple of contemporary romance novels and was inspired to give it a try.

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October 1st, 2014 - Customer Spotlights

Meet Christina Vuleta, a 40-Something Who’s Teaching 20-Somethings to Be More Disruptive, Part 2

Christina Vuleta is the founder of 40:20 Vision, a non-profit dedicated to bridging the gap between 40-something women and their 20-something counterparts. Christina had too many interesting stories to fit into one post, so we’ve published her interview in two installments. Here’s the second half!

If you were to give advice to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell her?

To not box yourself in or think that you have to follow a certain path. Just because there’s one traditional path in an industry, doesn’t mean that you need to take it. The best thing you can do is figure out what your strengths are and where those strengths are valued. You can be in companies where the people that get the most attention are the people that bring in the most business, but you don’t have to be good at new business to succeed in a company. If you’re really great at customer relationships, that’s really important too. Where the most noise is isn’t necessarily where your biggest values and successes will be. It’s really more about figuring out what your strengths are, what you like to do. Then figuring out where those are valued so you can really flourish and grow.

Also, not to get sidetracked by what everybody else is doing. And to put money in your 401K or savings or whatever you have. Just to know that there’s always going to be more opportunities. Every time you have a failure, it feels like the end of the world, but pretty soon you’re like, “Ah.” If you go through enough ups and downs, you know there’s going to be an up. Just know—as hard as it is at the time—there will be an up, and if you’re relatively smart and good at what you do, you’ll be able to create something.

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September 29th, 2014 - Customer Spotlights

Meet Christina Vuleta, a 40-Something Who’s Encouraging 20-Somethings to Be More Disruptive, Part 1

Christina Vuleta is the founder of 40:20 Vision, a non-profit dedicated to bridging the gap between 40-something women and their 20-something counterparts. Christina had too many interesting stories to fit into one post, so we’re publishing her interview in two installments. Enjoy the first half!

The Forty Women to Watch Over 40 list is an outgrowth of your organization, 40:20 Vision. When did that get started?

That started four or five years ago. I worked at a consultancy and we did a lot of work with generational research and trends, helping companies develop new white space or better positionings that are more future-focused.

I was out to brunch with some of my friends, all 40-somethings, and we were waiting for our table when these two younger girls, who were also waiting, started asking us questions about careers, boyfriends, dating in New York City, all that. We sat down, and I thought, “I wish we could just bottle it and give it to them.” They had this bravado, but they still didn’t have confidence. They were still asking the same questions we asked—they just didn’t know how awesome they were.

When I started talking about my idea, everybody was saying, “Oh, you can’t. You have to live it to learn it. 20-somethings don’t want advice.” I wondered where that came from. When you look at generational research, the boomer attitude was, “Don’t trust anyone over 30. It’s us versus them.” With millennials, it’s much more of a friendship with their parents, not an authoritarian relationship. They’re more focused on continual learning. Why wouldn’t you want to get more perspective from people who have been there and done that?

But I also didn’t want to be telling them what to do. At that brunch, I thought, “Look at us, there’s seven of us around the table. We’ve each made completely different decisions. There’s people who are married, not married, having a baby on their own, getting divorced, just getting engaged, starting a company, consulting. We’re all in totally different places, but the one thing we have in common is that now we’re making decisions for ourselves. Now we have that confidence to say, ‘This is what I want to do,’ rather than, ‘Oh, everyone’s getting married. I should get married.’” Our generation is the first that really had so much freedom to make the good choices.

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September 8th, 2014 - Customer Spotlights

Meet JohnPaul Bennet, an Education Enthusiast Who’s Taking a Page From Your Book

Ever gone through your old college notebooks to discover that most of them are half-used? Instead of letting them sit in storage purgatory, JohnPaul and his non-profit Turn the Pages Foundation will take them off your hands and turn them into new supplies for students at underserved schools.

Tell us a little about Turn the Pages and why you started it.

Turn the Pages is a non-profit dedicated to improving the pursuit of knowledge for students who lack access to essential school supplies. Every year, we collect supplies from sponsor schools, which we call “Page-Turners,” and match them with the needs of underserved schools, both locally and globally. We collect notebooks, pens, pencils, markers, binders, art supplies, textbooks, and reading books.

Lack of access to basic school supplies is a big reason children at underserved schools fail to advance to the next level, which is why we started the movement. We also wanted to give people who traditionally throw out supplies the opportunity to recycle by allowing children to reuse them.

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July 28th, 2014 - Customer Spotlights

Meet Laurie Scott, a Sarode Player Who Studied North India Classical Music with a Master for 25 Years

After returning to the States from India in her twenties, Laurie Scott wasn’t quite sure what to do with her life. Luckily, she discovered the Ali Akbar College of Music in California and has been devoting herself to its music ever since. Now with a new website, she’s teaching others about this form of music and its rich history.


How did you become interested in North Indian classical music?

I was surrounded by music as I grew up. As a teenager, I attended a concert of Ravi Shankar, the great sitar player, and it completely enthralled me. It affected me like no other music has. In my twenties, I lived in an ashram in India. We had really great musicians come and perform. My love for the music grew from there.

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February 26th, 2014 - Customer Spotlights

How Q-cord’s Onepager is Breaking Down Barriers for New York’s Most Famous Museums

Evan Stender is a product designer at 10-31 Industries, who builds museum displays and products for the likes of the MoMA, Sotheby’s, and the MET. But when the company realized that one of its most useful products was practically invisible on its own website, they used Onepager to increase product awareness.

Tell us a little about how Q-cord got started.

Q-cord is a retractable display barrier that was created by 10-31 Inc., a company my father founded almost 30 years ago. 10-31 sells a lot of items for the museum display market, but we rebranded Q-cord to set it apart as a unique, high-end product so that people weren’t coming to the same company for everything.

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